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UPDATED SEPTEMBER 18, 2001 6:51 PM ET
THE FOUNDATION
Engineers Tackle Havoc Beneath Trade Center
(NYT)
The twin towers of the World Trade Center rising in the 1970's.


Engineers Tackle Havoc Beneath Trade Center
By DENNIS OVERBYE
Attempts to dig out the remains of the World Trade Center's basement without proper precautions, engineers fear, could cause the walls to shift or rupture, leading to flooding and the destabilization of nearby buildings.


THE SKIES
Making Planes Safer by Making Fuels Safer
By WILLIAM J. BROAD
Crashed jets do not as a rule explode. They burn. And that, scientists say, raises the possibility that advanced fuels may one day make commercial planes safer.

DESIGN
Defending Skyscrapers Against Terror
By KENNETH CHANG
No one designs a skyscraper to withstand the direct hit of a fully fueled 767, and construction engineers agree that such an attack would have doomed almost any high-rise.

HAUNTING QUESTION
Did the Ban on Asbestos Lead to Loss of Life?
By JAMES GLANZ and ANDREW C. REVKIN
Some scientists and engineers wonder whether asbestos insulation might have kept the twin towers intact long enough for more people to have escaped.

THE ENVIRONMENT
Dust Is a Problem, but the Risk Seems Small
By ANDREW C. REVKIN
As thousands of workers streamed back into Lower Manhattan for the first time since the terrorist attacks, federal officials said they faced no significant health risk.

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After 120 Years, Puffins Are at Home Off Maine Coast After 120 Years, Puffins Are at Home Off Maine Coast
By THE NEW YORK TIMES
Since 1973, Dr. Stephen W. Kress has done whatever it took to persuade puffins to put down roots once again on Eastern Egg Rock, an island off the Maine coast. Now he can declare victory.



EARTH SCIENCE

E.P.A. Enforcement Nominee Withdraws

The Chemicals: Monitors Say Health Risk From Smoke Is Very Small

Traditional Spirits Block a $500 Million Dam Plan in Uganda

LIFE SCIENCE

After 120 Years, Puffins Are at Home Off Maine Coast

Observatory: From Dust to Red Tide

Protect Sharks? Recent Attacks Fuel Old Argument

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

Physicists Strive to Build a Black Hole

Buckyball Success May Lead the Way to Practical New Superconductors

X-Ray Orbiter Becomes a Particle Physics Experiment

SOCIAL SCIENCE

New Evidence of Early Humans Unearthed in Russia's North

The Map That Named America May Now Call It Home

Bad Luck and the Ill-Fated Antarctic Expedition of 1912

SPACE

Worn Spacecraft Takes on Another Challenge, Comet Borrelly

Russia Adds Module to Space Station

Physicists Strive to Build a Black Hole

OBSERVATORY
From Dust to Red Tide
By HENRY FOUNTAIN
This week's column includes items on toxic algae, the rumblings of undersea volcanoes and Cincinnati's bouncing baby rhino.
More Observatory Columns

SKY WATCH
The Little Fox The Little Fox
By JOE RAO
On most star charts Vulpecula, the Little Fox, seems to be nothing more than a formless splattering of dim stars.
More Sky Watch Columns

Q & A
Asleep on Their Feet
By C. CLAIBORNE RAY
This week's question: Why do horses sleep standing up?
More Q&A Columns


READERS' OPINIONS
Join a Discussion on Wildlife and Zoology
jaqow writes:To all hypereco-friendly people out there trying to save everything: death is as much a part of life as anything else and there's no such thing as an unnatural death.


We welcome your comments about The New York Times on the Web science section.


News From AP

Caterpillars Make Noise to Threaten 2:20 a.m. ET

NASA'a Mars Odyssey Adjusts Course 11:28 p.m. ET

More News From AP





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